The Future Looks Mobile

Is the future mobile? It certainly seems so. Nowadays, we can do anything from our smartphone; there’s an app for virtually everything, from checking the weather forecast and booking our trips to keeping track of our spending habits and obtaining customized budget plans. We demand that information and services to be available on our smartphones at the speed of light, and of course,

we want it in our own language.

According to Strategy

Analytics, a global research and consulting firm, there are over 1 billion smartphones in use today (1 in 7 people worldwide own a smartphone). It took 16 years to reach this number, but the company predicts that in just 3 years (by 2015), another billion smartphones will be in use across the globe. Compared to our current world population of 7 billion, 1 billion may seem very little and indeed the vast majority of people do not own a smartphone; however, Strategy Analytics sees massive potential for smartphone use and future growth in emerging markets such as China, India and Africa.

Globalization and localization go hand in hand; and just like with a website or product, taking a mobile app global means more than just translating the content from one language into another;

it should also be adapted to the criteria of the target market. Cultural variations, idiomatic expressions, images and even the color and layout of mobile pages are all important factors for the success of an app in a given market.

Source:
Business Wire
Strategy Analytics

Translation and Localization Mistakes Lead to Lost Profits

A few months ago we posted an article called “Worst Translation Blunders in Business,” which listed some legendary translation mistakes. While a few

businesses may get away with some laughs here and there, for most, poor translation and localization is synonymous with losing face, customers, profits and sometimes even the entire business.

Several years ago, Global Information Management provider,

SDL International, conducted a survey, which revealed the negative impact inaccurate translation and localization can have on international companies. It showed that an astounding 80% of the global companies surveyed experienced lost revenue due to translation and localization issues. A further 40% of the respondents stated they have had to delay product launches because of mistranslations, and 7% claimed they had received fines by local governments for non-compliance as a result of translation errors.

Naturally, businesses want to make a fast market entry and cut costs; but by bypassing proper translation

and localization, companies are exposing themselves to even higher financial, not to mention, image costs. Large, multinational corporations often have the means to recover from their translation blunders; however, for small and medium-sized enterprises, it may very well lead to their demise.

As Chief Marketing Officer at SDL International, Chris Boorman warns: “being first to market is pointless if you cannot communicate with your audience…it doesn’t matter how loud you shout – if you’re speaking the wrong language, you simply won’t be heard.”

dakwak’s website translation and localization technology can help you speak the “right” languages and be heard around the world. Try our free trial here.

Source:

Business Wire

Over 70% of Internet Users in China Rely on Online Translator Services

According to China’s biggest online multilingual translation service provider, fanyi.youdao.com, 73.7% of Chinese internet users rely on online translation tools with English being the most popular source and target language.

The study revealed that when it comes to translating from Chinese to English, the online tools are mostly used for communication purposes, i.e. to translate words and sentences for greetings, chats and introductions. Chinese internet users also depend on online translation services to translate

information and articles from English to their native language.
But not all internet users are happy with online translators; almost 20% of the survey participants reported they would be willing to pay for professional (human) translation

services because existing machine translation services did not meet their expectations.

Whether Chinese internet users master English or not, one thing is evident: the majority of them – as do other international internet users – like to browse sites in their native language and ideally sites that have localized content. Common Sense Advisory research also tells us that 85% of internet surfers require information in their own language before making an online purchase.

With 538 million internet users, China has by far (the US follows with about 245 million users) the largest internet population in the world. Many of those

internet users could, at this very moment, be searching for information, products and services that you offer.

You can have it up and running in no time, without any technical involvement and dakwak’s technology allows your website to be found by users searching in their native language.

Best of all, dakwak gives you the flexibility to choose which parts of your website get translated by machine, the crowd or professional translators.Is your website translated and localized for

Chinese-speaking markets? dakwak can help you deliver a translated and fully localized version of your website catering to your target audience.

Don’t miss out on the

millions of people searching for what you are offering. Try our free trial today! Click here to start

Sources:
China

Daily
Common Sense Advisory

Demand for Translation and Localization Services on the Rise

When computers, the internet and languages meet, a market worth US$33.5 billion – and growing at a rate of 12% a year – is the result. Yes, language services are in demand, even during global economic recession. Increased international commerce and immigration, among other things, are driving the need for translation and localization services.

Who rely most on language services? According to Common Sense Advisory, out of 36 industries researched, 10 account for 50% of all language services revenue. In descending order of market share, these are:

  1. Professional services: scientific and technical activities such as legal, accounting, management consulting and advertising.
  2. Health care and social work.
  3. Financial and insurance.
  4. Public administration: defense, justice and social services.
  5. Machinery and equipment manufacturing.
  6. Pharmaceutical manufacturing.
  7. Electronic, computer and optical products manufacturing.
  8. Education.
  9. Software publishing.
  10. Heavy manufacturing: motor

    vehicles, trailers and other transport equipment.

The language services market may be booming, but what about all the businesses that are not localizing their websites? According to dakwak data, unless companies effectively localize their websites for each specific country or language, they

are potentially losing out on US$30 trillion in internet sales. Read the press release here.

Many businesses fail to properly localize their websites because they associate the process with high costs; however, dakwak’s cloud-based translation and localization software offers fully flexible solutions to businesses of all sizes and budgets, without technical involvement or the need to hire multiple localization teams or developers. Learn more about dakwak’s translation technology.

Press Release: Marketers Losing Trillions in Lost Sales Due to Website Translation

  • ‘Black hole’ of sales that are lost in translation as high as $30 trillion
  • Eleven languages can reach 85 per cent of the world’s population
  • Translation technology allows marketers to localise website content without ‘on-the-ground teams’

A $30 trillion internet sales black hole is being lost in translation because marketers are not localising their websites for different countries, according to online translation technology company Dakwak.

In the past two years the economic potential of making money online has grown from $36.5 to $44.6 trillion. However, just one third of that figure is available if websites are only available

in English. And, according to Dakwak, that figure is even less with websites solely in languages not as widely used as English – for example Portuguese, Russian or Japanese. This leaves $30 trillion in potential untapped sales which businesses could be cashing in on.*

According to Waheed Barghouthi, CEO at Dakwak, language is a key factor in online purchasing behaviour – however some businesses are missing out on potentially large sums of money by failing to adapt their sites for the global marketplace.

Just eleven languages gain access to 85 per cent of the world’s online wallet, according to Dakwak.

Waheed said: “Research has shown that 85 per cent of consumers are more inclined to buy a product when confronted with information in their own language, and 54 per cent say this is more important than the actual price.

“This tells us that comfort and confidence in reading a website that has been translated into your language is a huge factor in the purchasing decision, but many businesses are failing to do this, as they see website translation and localisation as a costly exercise involving big budgets and teams of people.”

Launched today [November 21], Dakwak, a cloud-based software, helps companies of varying sizes and budgets that are looking to take their business further into international markets.

It completely removes the entire process of putting up a translated version of a website such as any technical involvement and employing localised teams in several countries and is the only software which gives marketers total control over their translated websites, as they are able to put up, take down and edit any translated content themselves.

And Dakwak’s unique multi-layered system, allows marketers the flexibility to choose between crowd, machine and professional translation options.

Waheed added: “The potential for businesses to maximise sales by creating localised content, without having to hire teams of translators and developers, or even visit the country you want to sell to, is enormous. The internet has broken

down borders for global trade, and removing language barriers

by using online translation software can help change a business’s fortunes.”

Ends

For more information contact greg.aris@smarts.co.uk or visit dakwak.com

Figures quoted from CSA Research report 2012 ‘In the past two years, the addressable economic potential using online communication has risen from US$36.5 trillion to $44.6 trillion. Only a third of that total is addressable

in English as a native tongue.’