The Future Looks Mobile

Is the future mobile? It certainly seems so. Nowadays, we can do anything from our smartphone; there’s an app for virtually everything, from checking the weather forecast and booking our trips to keeping track of our spending habits and obtaining customized budget plans. We demand that information and services to be available on our smartphones at the speed of light, and of course,

we want it in our own language.

According to Strategy

Analytics, a global research and consulting firm, there are over 1 billion smartphones in use today (1 in 7 people worldwide own a smartphone). It took 16 years to reach this number, but the company predicts that in just 3 years (by 2015), another billion smartphones will be in use across the globe. Compared to our current world population of 7 billion, 1 billion may seem very little and indeed the vast majority of people do not own a smartphone; however, Strategy Analytics sees massive potential for smartphone use and future growth in emerging markets such as China, India and Africa.

Globalization and localization go hand in hand; and just like with a website or product, taking a mobile app global means more than just translating the content from one language into another;

it should also be adapted to the criteria of the target market. Cultural variations, idiomatic expressions, images and even the color and layout of mobile pages are all important factors for the success of an app in a given market.

Source:
Business Wire
Strategy Analytics

Dakwak API: Search

Dakwak Search API allows you to search in all versions of your website. It returns the phrases that match your query in the translated and the original versions of your website, along with the pages where these phrases were found. To use it, simply send a Request with a search query, then a Response will be returned -in JSON or XML format- with the search results that match your query.

Request

Send a POST request to the following:

dakwak.com/api/search.json?apikey=API_KEY&lang=LANG&q=PHRASE

Then, replace the bold capitalized words with their corresponding values:

  • apikey: this is long unique string used to identify your website, and to allow you to access the search API. To request your website’s API Key, go to Dashboard -> My Website Content -> Settings then click on blue the button “Request API Key”. An email will be sent to the support staff at dakwak and they will contact you with your website’s API Key.
  • q: the phrase you want to search for, it can be in any language you translated your website to.
  • lang: the language of the phrase you want to search for. Use the shortcut of the language, based on this table:
    Language Shortcut Language Shortcut Language Shortcut
    Afrikaans af Greek el Romanian ro
    Albanian sq Hebrew iw Russian ru
    Arabic ar Hindi hi Serbian sr
    Belarusian be Hungarian hu Slovak sk
    Bulgarian bg Icelandic is Slovenian sl
    Catalan ca Indonesian id Spanish es
    Chinese (Simplified) zh-CN Irish ga Swahili sw
    Croatian hr Italian it Swedish sv
    Czech cs Japanese ja Thai th
    Danish da Korean ko Turkish tr
    Dutch nl Latvian lv Ukrainian uk
    English en Lithuanian lt Vietnamese vi
    Estonian et Macedonian mk Welsh cy
    Filipino tl Malay ms Yiddish yi
    Finnish fi Maltese mt Urdu ur
    French fr Persian fa Chinese (Traditional) zh-TW
    Galician gl Polish pl French

    (Canada)

    fr-CA
    German de Portuguese (Europe) pt-PT Spanish (Latin America) es-LA
    Portuguese (Brazil) pt-BR

The request should look something like this:
dakwak.com/api/search.json?apikey=12356789abcde&lang=ar&q=مرحبا
or, if you’re searching in Spanish:
dakwak.com/api/search.json?apikey=12356789abcde&lang=es&q=hola

Response

When you send the request, and if all fields are valid, you will get a response that looks like this:

{"apikey": "12356789abcde",
"lang": "es",
"q":"hola",
"results":[
{
"source_text": "hello world",
"translated_text": "hola mundo",
"page_urls": ["/page1", "/page2"]
}
{
"source_text": "hi",
"translated_text": "hola",
"page_urls": ["/page3", "/page4"]
}
]}

  • apikey, lang and q fields contain the same values of the request
  • results is an array that contains the search results, each element contains:
    • source_text: the original un-translated phrase
    • translated_text: the translated phrase that matches the query
    • page_urls: an array of page URLs where the searched query was found

Error codes

If you get an error instead of search results, it means your request contains invalid information or misses some required information. Please check the correct request format.

  • 1100: ‘apikey’ is a required field
    You left the apikey field empty, didn’t include it in your request, or misspelled ‘apikey’
  • 1101: ‘lang’ is a required field
    You left the lang field empty, didn’t include it in your request, or misspelled ‘lang’
  • 1102: ‘q’ is a required field
    You left the q field empty or didn’t include it in your request
  • 1300: apikey must be valid

    You used a wrong API key; make sure you copy the full API key of your website

  • 1301: language is not
    valid or supported

    The language you requested is not supported by dakwak.com or does not exist. Make sure to choose the correct language shortcut from the table above

  • 1500: language is not included in your plan
    The language you chose is not included in your plan, please choose another language

Translation and Localization Mistakes Lead to Lost Profits

A few months ago we posted an article called “Worst Translation Blunders in Business,” which listed some legendary translation mistakes. While a few

businesses may get away with some laughs here and there, for most, poor translation and localization is synonymous with losing face, customers, profits and sometimes even the entire business.

Several years ago, Global Information Management provider,

SDL International, conducted a survey, which revealed the negative impact inaccurate translation and localization can have on international companies. It showed that an astounding 80% of the global companies surveyed experienced lost revenue due to translation and localization issues. A further 40% of the respondents stated they have had to delay product launches because of mistranslations, and 7% claimed they had received fines by local governments for non-compliance as a result of translation errors.

Naturally, businesses want to make a fast market entry and cut costs; but by bypassing proper translation

and localization, companies are exposing themselves to even higher financial, not to mention, image costs. Large, multinational corporations often have the means to recover from their translation blunders; however, for small and medium-sized enterprises, it may very well lead to their demise.

As Chief Marketing Officer at SDL International, Chris Boorman warns: “being first to market is pointless if you cannot communicate with your audience…it doesn’t matter how loud you shout – if you’re speaking the wrong language, you simply won’t be heard.”

dakwak’s website translation and localization technology can help you speak the “right” languages and be heard around the world. Try our free trial here.

Source:

Business Wire

Saving Endangered Languages Through Digital Technology

Often blamed for propelling endangered languages into extinction, globalization, technology and the internet may in fact be able to accomplish the opposite and save our world’s fragile languages from disappearing altogether. And what a needed task that is because according to UNESCO, unless something is done, only half of the 6000 plus languages spoken worldwide today will exist by the end of this century.

The good news is, something is being done. To help preserve eight endangered languages, K David Harrison, an associate professor of linguistics at Swarthmore College, and National Geographic have developed online talking dictionaries, which feature more than 24,000 audio recordings by native speakers and over 32,000 word entries. Some of the endangered languages included in the talking dictionaries are: Matukar Panau (Papua New Guinea); Chamacoco (Paraguay); Remo (India); and Tuvan (Siberia and Mongolia).

Language Extinction Hot-Spot by National Geographic

Harrison also believes text messaging, and social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are providing the ideal means for speakers of endangered languages to “expand their voice and expand their presence.”

Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe) is one example. Spoken by only a few hundred people in Canada and the United States, this Native American language is being kept alive via a website and Facebook page thanks to the efforts of Margaret Noori, professor of Native American studies at the University of Michigan.

Mobile apps can also help revive languages on the brink of extinction. Ma! Iwaidja is a smartphone app designed to prevent the disappearance of Iwaidja, an indigenous language spoken by less than 200 people on Croker Island, Australia. The free app, which includes a 1500-entry English-Iwaidja dictionary with audio and a 450-entry phrase book, allows users to easily upload and update entries, which they soon will also be able to share via an online database.

Sources:

BBC

CNN

Over 70% of Internet Users in China Rely on Online Translator Services

According to China’s biggest online multilingual translation service provider, fanyi.youdao.com, 73.7% of Chinese internet users rely on online translation tools with English being the most popular source and target language.

The study revealed that when it comes to translating from Chinese to English, the online tools are mostly used for communication purposes, i.e. to translate words and sentences for greetings, chats and introductions. Chinese internet users also depend on online translation services to translate

information and articles from English to their native language.
But not all internet users are happy with online translators; almost 20% of the survey participants reported they would be willing to pay for professional (human) translation

services because existing machine translation services did not meet their expectations.

Whether Chinese internet users master English or not, one thing is evident: the majority of them – as do other international internet users – like to browse sites in their native language and ideally sites that have localized content. Common Sense Advisory research also tells us that 85% of internet surfers require information in their own language before making an online purchase.

With 538 million internet users, China has by far (the US follows with about 245 million users) the largest internet population in the world. Many of those

internet users could, at this very moment, be searching for information, products and services that you offer.

You can have it up and running in no time, without any technical involvement and dakwak’s technology allows your website to be found by users searching in their native language.

Best of all, dakwak gives you the flexibility to choose which parts of your website get translated by machine, the crowd or professional translators.Is your website translated and localized for

Chinese-speaking markets? dakwak can help you deliver a translated and fully localized version of your website catering to your target audience.

Don’t miss out on the

millions of people searching for what you are offering. Try our free trial today! Click here to start

Sources:
China

Daily
Common Sense Advisory